Thai Dragon

Thai Dragon

Unavailable — SKU: PP659A $4.00 Size: 1 seedling

Capsicum frutescens. Sow Thai Dragon pepper seeds for the bird chiles that are ideal for Thai and Vietnamese cuisine. Unlike some other... Read More

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More details about Thai Dragon

Capsicum frutescens. Sow Thai Dragon pepper seeds for the bird chiles that are ideal for Thai and Vietnamese cuisine. Unlike some other hot pepper varieties that tend to droop, Thai Dragon pepper plants are loaded with clusters of slender red chile peppers that point up above the green leaves on short 40cm (16") sturdy plants. Chinese chefs sometimes call these "facing heaven" peppers because they point upward. The decorative appeal of these plants make them ideal for container gardening. At the end of the summer, if some peppers are still on the plant, pull it up and hang indoors as a decoration or for some spicy southeast Asian recipes. These peppers dry very well for long storage, and they keep their heat. 50,000 - 100,000 SHU's.

Matures in 85 days. (Open-pollinated seeds)

Quick Facts:

    • Spicy hot
    • Clusters of slender red peppers
    • Great for container gardening
    • Open-pollinated seeds
    • Matures in 85 days

All About Thai Dragon

When I Get My Seedling Home

When I Get My Seedling Home
Keep seedlings under very bright light to prevent legginess. Artificial lights are ideal, but a bright (ideally, south-facing) room will work for the short term. You may have to pot on seedlings more than once before they go out to allow for root growth. This is done by transplanting them into a slightly larger container with enough additional soil to keep the container mostly full. Keep the soil moist by daily watering and allow for free drainage so the plants are never sitting water.

Transplanting

Transplanting
Do not transplant outside until night time temperatures are steadily 10°C (50°F) or warmer. This may mean keeping seedlings indoors for up to a month. The plants should not require any fertilizer until transplant time.

Tomatoes thrive in fertile, well-drained soil that is high in organic matter. Dig in finished compost and/or manure, and add 1 cup complete organic fertilizer beneath each transplant. Dig a hole in the garden approximately the same size as the seedling container, or a couple of inches deeper. Invert the seedling and gently tease it from its container by holding the stem and supporting the root ball. Tomato seedlings can be transplanted either to the same depth of their container, or slightly deeper, up to the first set of leaves. Press the root ball into the soil, fill in with soil, and water thoroughly.

Growing

Growing
Soil should have abundant phosphorus and calcium, so add lime and compost to the bed at least three weeks prior to transplanting. Mix ½ cup of complete organic fertilizer beneath each plant. Though peppers will tolerate dry soil, they will only make good growth if kept moist. Harden off before planting out in June, 30-60cm (12-24″) apart. Water in with kelp-based fertilizer. Using plastic mulch with a cloche can increase the temperature by a few degrees. Pinch back growing tips to encourage leaf production. This helps shade peppers and prevents sun-scald in hot summers.

Harvest

Harvest
When fruit is firm it is ready to pick. But if you wait the fruit will ripen further turning red, yellow, brown or purple. The sweetness and vitamin C content go up dramatically when the fruit changes colour. If you pick green the total numbers of peppers harvested will increase. Fruit that sets after late August will not usually develop or ripen. Pull out the entire bush just before the first frost and hang it upside down in a warm, dry place to ripen hot peppers. Expect 5-10 large bell peppers per well-grown plant, 20-50 hot peppers per plant.

Diseases & Pests

Diseases & Pests
To prevent rot and wilt, plant in well-drained soils and follow a 4-year rotation. If cutworms are a problem, use paper collars at the plant base. Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV): young growth is malformed and leaves are mottled with yellow. To prevent it: wash hands after handling tobacco, before touching peppers. Control aphids, which spread the disease.

Companion Planting

Companion Planting
Pepper plants make good neighbours for asparagus, basil, carrots, cucumbers, eggplant, endive, oregano, parsley, rosemary, squash, Swiss chard, and tomatoes. Never plant them next to beans, Brassicas, or fennel.

More on Companion Planting.
Read more About Peppers.

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